helping a smoker quit

Helping a smoker quit!

 

Do you have a friend, family member or colleague you want to help quit smoking? Supporting someone through the quitting process can be a challenge and is one of the key factors to quitting success.

quit smokingYou can certainly help a smoker quit but you can’t do it for them. The decision to quit needs to come from the smoker. Here are some tips on how to support a smoker through the quitting process:

  • Listen. Acknowledging their feelings throughout the quitting process is a great supportive strategy.
  • Stay positive. “Nagging” promotes negative energy which may deter the smoker and lead them further away from their quitting goal.
  • Do some research on nicotine addiction and the harmful effects of cigarette smoke. The more you understand that smoking is an addiction, the more understanding you will be during the quitting process.
  • Quitting takes time. Let the smoker talk about their setbacks because they are bound to happen. Encourage them to keep trying and stay focused on their reason for quitting.

Five stages of quitting smoking:

1. Not thinking about quitting
2. Thinking about quitting
3. Preparing to quit
4. Quitting
5. Staying smoke free for good

Smokers usually make 4-5 attempts at quitting before they are successful. They may also go back and forth between stages before they actually quit for good. Let the smoker know you believe in them no matter how many attempts they have made or what stage they are in.

Ready, set, quit!

  • Create a smoke free environment for you and the smoker at home or at work. For example, declare the car or the inside of your house a smoke free zone.
  • Have the smoker set a Quit Date. Setting a quit date establishes commitment and accountability to the quitting process.
  • Listen and respect their feelings regarding withdrawal symptoms. Know that smoking is a physical addiction and symptoms will pass with time.
  • Quitting takes time. Let the smoker talk about their setbacks because they are bound to happen. Encourage them to keep trying and stay focused on their reason for quitting.
  • Be a cheerleader! Celebrate milestones with the person trying to quit. It’s important to acknowledge their successes.
  • Learn from Failure. If the smoker starts smoking again, help brainstorm what worked and what didn’t work to help them be successful for the next attempt.

Be committed to the process and know you are helping in a big way just by showing you care. If you need more information regarding quitting smoking yourself or helping a smoker quit please contact your Copeman Healthcare team for more information and support.